Emergency Planning Quadrant

Personal Strategies

If you lock yourself out, you’ll need a locksmith. Here’s some simple precautions to take, and a few things to try first.

Suppose you’re snowed in and can’t get to work? Take a look at this guide to your legal position – as both an employee and an employer.

Is your area at risk from flooding? What should you do?

Some ideas for your grab bag and an example of the sort of ready-made evacuation bags you can buy.  The Resilience Handbook has a list of important items to include if you need to make your own in a hurry….and the book comes with its own flood proof snap top bag ( if you buy it through me ) …..remember to put important papers in a sealable plastic bag inside your rucksack.  If it’s flooding, chances are it’s raining too and home printer ink isn’t waterproof.

Do you know how to turn your utilities off safely? You can protect your home better if you understand the basic principles behind these services.

A guide to emergency procedures at schools in the UK

It’s a challenge to list all the local radio stations in the UK, but Wikipedia have had a go! Check this information before you rely on it, as frequencies may change unnoticed; it’s a long list.

In the UK, the National Health Service and the Government websites will be used for emergency announcements; you could bookmark them.

Are there any large facilities dealing with dangerous chemicals or fuel oil in your area?

American preppers are always good for practical survival tips; here’s instructions for assembling a first aid kit. The Home page here has some interesting advice too; it changes over time so take notes.

A basic animated guide to filtering dirty water ready to boil for drinking.

Local Strategies

The underpinning Strategic National Framework on Community Resilience document from March 2011 seems to have been archived, but more up to date documents can be found here

How to find the emergency plans for your area.

The archived text of the Pitt Review on the 2007 flooding in the UK

A useful report on community resilience by the Young Foundation.

National Strategies

How to find out more about official emergency plans in the UK

More about UK emergency plans

The text of the UK Civil Contingencies Act 2004 , including current revisions

UK government guidance on part 1 of the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 – Emergency Preparedness

and on Part 2 – Response and Recovery

It’s very important that everyone uses the same words to mean the same things in an emergency response. Many of the people involved may not have met before, and there won’t be time to sort out misunderstandings. The Civil Protection Lexicon defines terms likely to be used.

The same applies to map symbols.

Guidance on emergency planning exercises and training in the UK.

UK National Risk Register

What is COBRA?

What’s Integrated Emergency Management?  Here’s a description of doctrine and principles