Travel advice

Travel is particularly difficult this holiday season. While you’re worrying whether your journey is necessary enough to satisfy the quarantine police, don’t forget to check the weather forecast before you set out!

There is a warning of severe rain and high winds for the latter part of Boxing Day (Saturday, for the many who have lost all track of time by now) in Britain. There may be some flooding, or fallen trees and cross-winds.

If you’re driving in high winds, try to use main roads, where there is less chance of falling branches. Look out for side gusts, especially on exposed parts of the road. Your vehicle can be blown off course, other traffic may be pushed into your path, or debris may fly across the road. Take care when overtaking, keep both hands on the wheel and concentrate at all times. You are not safe.

A wet road surface is slippery. Stay a good distance behind the car in front, and reduce your speed. Investing in good tyres with a deep tread helps protect you from aquaplaning. You shouldn’t attempt to drive through flood water. Even if it looks shallow, you can’t see what’s under the surface.

Hail can fall with such violence that it could break your side or rear car windows, which are not as strong as the windscreen. Try to pull over during a severe hailstorm, if it’s safe to do so.

Pedestrians can face many dangers as well. Apart from the hazards posed by drivers losing control of their vehicles, you are more vulnerable to wind-blown debris when on foot. Keep away from the sheltered side of high walls and trees where possible. If they fall, it will be in this direction.

You are unlikely to be out on foot while the storm is raging, but once the rain has stopped you might venture to walk the dog or go to the shops. Don’t try to walk through flood water, especially if it’s moving. Remember one cubic metre of water weighs a ton – as much as a small car – so a hand’s depth can easily sweep you off your feet and carry you into the nearby river.

It’s still winter, and the weather can be challenging. Pay attention!

These tips, and other advice about bad weather driving, can be found in The Handbook of Practical Resilience. It’s the go-to book for emergencies!

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